On claiming a bill is yours, without giving proper credit

Here we have a bill introduced by U.S. Senator Jon Tester (D-MT), which he introduced in 2011.  It was called the “Making Public Lands Public Access Act of 2011″ and uses funding from the Land and Water Conservation fund acquire lands around existing public lands that would also to improve access for hunters and anglers access to those existing public lands.

And here we have a bill by U.S. Senator Martin Heinrich (D-NM), which he introduced in 2013.  Sen. Heinrich first introduced the bill in 2012.  It would use funding from the Land and Water Conservation Fund to acquire lands that would improve access for hunters and anglers to existing public lands.

And here we have a press release from Congressman Steve Daines (R-MT).  The press release, which just came out last week, does not credit Tester for first proposing the bill Daines is now seeking media attention for supporting.  Daines says his bill would–you guessed it–use funding from the Land and Water Conservation Fund to acquire lands that would improve access for hunters and anglers to existing public lands.

In fact Daines’ bill even uses the exact same percentage of Land and Water Conservation Fund money–1.5%.  Daines’ bill is called simply “Making Public Lands Public Access Act.”  He left off the date.

Just pointing out the glaring omission by the Daines cheerleaders, who went all Twitter Rambo on John Walsh for saying that the Bullock/Walsh administration signed a fairly modest piece of digital privacy legislation, which they did.

Montana legislators cannot make law without it first going through the governor’s office, though they really hate to admit it.

Posted: February 5, 2014 at 7:39 pm

6 thoughts on “On claiming a bill is yours, without giving proper credit

  1. Craig Moore

    Great topic. Can someone explain why Walsh is attempting to bask in the reflected glory of legislation he had NOTHING to do with? http://johnwalsh2014.com/what-john-fights-for/

    I’m proud to have worked with Governor Bullock on passing a law requiring state and local governments to get warrants before accessing personal cell phone data – becoming the first state in history to prohibit warrantless cell phone tracking.

    I believe Walsh is referring to HB 603 put forth by Republican Daniel Zolnikov. http://mediatrackers.org/montana/2014/02/05/democrat-walsh-takes-credit-montana-republicans-privacy-bill

  2. Jan Thomas

    Some of these tweeters need to put down the bong for a bit. Saying the administration didn’t support a bill because they signed it into law is like saying a legislator didn’t support a bill because she or he introduced it.

    1. Craig Moore

      Jan, Walsh’s comment where he claims credit appears under the heading, “What John Fights For.” Now, unless he can show that he publicly supported the bill before the vote and went to and testified for it at the hearing, it appears to be quite the lie that he “fought for it” as he claimed.

  3. Crow

    How did Walsh “work with Governor Bullock on passing a law requiring state and local governments to get warrants before accessing personal cell phone data?” Did Walsh give Bullock a hand massage before Bullock signed the bill? Did Walsh hand him the pen? He sure didn’t show up to any hearings, publicly fight for the bill, or lobby any legislators. Walsh was simply the Lt Governor at a time when a Freshman lawmaker got a good bill passed. Sure, Walsh didn’t fight the bill, at least publicly that anyone is aware of, but to say that he “worked with Governor Bullock” to pass the bill is garbage.

    And to say that “Montana legislators cannot make law without it first going through the governor’s office, though they really hate to admit it,” is a joke, right? Bullock had little contact with the majority in the House & Senate in 2013. Very few bills originated in Bullock’s office in 2013. Most bills didn’t end up in the Gov’s office until it came time to sign or veto.

  4. Jan Thomas

    I’m pretty sure the constitution prohibits bills from originating in the governor’s office – but you conservatives are experts on the constitution so of course you knew that .

  5. Felix Meligrino

    To think that the Gov’s office has no input on bills before they get passed is ridiculous. You can’t just base it on testimony or committee hearings. Hearings are theatre. The reality of legislating is that deals get cut all the time and the Gov’s office can often times be involved.

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