A Line in the Sand

Montana Republicans have clarified a very important piece of party doctrine this week about which there had formerly been much confusion.  Yellowstone County Republicans turned away a congressional candidate from attending their annual Lincoln-Reagan Dinner, clearing up once and for all what kind of behavior they consider to be racist and what they do not.

Here’s what you need to know:

When a person who is a candidate on the GOP ticket, who has no chance of being elected, makes national news for calling for another “Operation Wetback” and saying that only white people should be allowed to immigrate to the U.S., Montana Republicans will speak out against you in the press and bar you from their chicken dinner.

However, when an elected Republican official, donor, activist or leader in Montana makes a joke about how blacks like watermelon; or makes an Obama effigy on Halloween out of a pumpkin in blackface; or brings a bullet-ridden outhouse labeled “Obama Library” to the state convention’ or sells bumper stickers that say “Don’t Re-Nigg in 2012“; or calls the President a Kenyan; or wears a confederate flag, or says that the south was right during the civil war; or is a Klansman running for Congress; or is a federal judge who sends a racist email; or produces a documentary about how Obama’s secret plan is to start a race war; or distributes racist flyers about Indians; or is a county official who uses the n-word in his work emails; or choose Black History Month to send a racist flyer advertising the GOP Lincoln Day Dinner; or is a U.S. Senator and says “It’s a hell of a challenge” when asked by a constituent, “Senator Burns, how can you live back there in D.C., with all them n-words?”–this kind of thing is considered perfectly acceptable.  No criticism or denouncement is rendered and your presence is welcome.

Posted: March 18, 2014 at 6:08 am

This post was written by Cowgirl

13 thoughts on “A Line in the Sand

  1. Turner

    In defiance of the ugly displays of racism found in parts of the state, we Beaverhead County Democrats have relabeled our semiannual event the “Jefferson-Obama Dinner.” It’s high time we recognized our president as the historical phenomenon he is and discarded the racist Andrew Jackson — who was so proud of his record as an Indian killer — who is routinely honored at “Jefferson-Jackson” dinners.

    The dinner will be in Dillon on April 11 at the Elks Lodge. Attendees will include all three senatorial candidates (Walsh, Adams, Bohlinger), congressional candidate John Lewis, and several other well known Dems.

    Tickets are $20.

    1. Kevin D Curtis

      Mr. Turner, I hear that Rep. Amanda Curtis will be at the “Jefferson-Obama Dinner” singing with her old-time gospel string band. It should be a great fun in Dillon that night!

    2. Bill Freese

      Good for you! Without going into details though, Jefferson had race problems of his own. Republican dinners honor Lincoln, who would almost certainly be a Democrat today, and Reagan, who was a Democrat in his youth. Democrats should honor presidents who represent the modern party. How about FDR-Obama?

  2. Turner

    Right you are. And I hear she’s dragging her poor husband and “Smokey” along with her. It should be a great evening!

  3. Seargeant Peppers

    Jefferson owned slaves, and would hardly be a Dem by todays ideological lines in the sand. FDR Obama would make sense. BTW not all conservatives are racists….newsflash

      1. Craig Moore

        Peppers has a point about Jefferson. How about just calling it the Clinton – Obama dinner? http://www.politico.com/news/stories/0110/31302.html

        In lobbying the late Sen. Ted Kennedy to endorse his wife, former President Bill Clinton angered the liberal icon by belittling Obama. Telling a friend about the conversation, Kennedy recalled Clinton had said “a few years ago, this guy would have been getting us coffee,” the authors paraphrase. A spokesman for the former president declined to comment on the claim.

        1. Turner

          I’m no historian, but there’s this about TJ and slavery from Wikipedia:

          Jefferson lived in a Virginia planter society economically dependent on slavery. A wealthy slave owner himself, he employed slave labor which he depended on to run his household and work the fields and shops. Children of slaves began work at the age of ten, either in the fields, the nailery, the textile shop, or in the houses according to their capabilities. Children under ten usually minded the infants or did other light work in and around the house.[220][221] Yet throughout his life Jefferson maintained that the institution of slavery was harmful to both slave and master in his writings and discourse.[222][223] His views on slavery and African slaves, however, were complex; historians are divided on whether he truly opposed the institution largely because Jefferson was publicly silent on emancipation during his presidency and only freed a few slaves on his Monticello plantation.[224][225] Some researchers suggest Jefferson’s slave ownership contradicted his philosophy of “all men are created equal”.[224] Other historians, however, maintain that the sentiment in this statement is what actually inspired and drove Jefferson to advance legislation to abolish slavery and that [226] he believed slavery was contrary to the laws of nature where everyone had a right to personal liberty.[227] Jefferson attempted to legislate the emancipation of slaves on three occasions; once in 1769 at the Virginia General Assembly,[228] another in 1784 at the Continental Congress [229] and once when he proposed to ban slavery in all Western Territories after 1800 where he was defeated by Congress by one vote.[224] Jefferson lived in a Virginia planter society economically dependent on slavery. A wealthy slave owner himself, he employed slave labor which he depended on to run his household and work the fields and shops. Children of slaves began work at the age of ten, either in the fields, the nailery, the textile shop, or in the houses according to their capabilities. Children under ten usually minded the infants or did other light work in and around the house.[220][221] Yet throughout his life Jefferson maintained that the institution of slavery was harmful to both slave and master in his writings and discourse.[222][223] His views on slavery and African slaves, however, were complex; historians are divided on whether he truly opposed the institution largely because Jefferson was publicly silent on emancipation during his presidency and only freed a few slaves on his Monticello plantation.[224][225] Some researchers suggest Jefferson’s slave ownership contradicted his philosophy of “all men are created equal”.[224] Other historians, however, maintain that the sentiment in this statement is what actually inspired and drove Jefferson to advance legislation to abolish slavery and that [226] he believed slavery was contrary to the laws of nature where everyone had a right to personal liberty.[227] Jefferson attempted to legislate the emancipation of slaves on three occasions; once in 1769 at the Virginia General Assembly,[228] another in 1784 at the Continental Congress [229] and once when he proposed to ban slavery in all Western Territories after 1800 where he was defeated by Congress by one vote.[224]

  4. Greg Strandberg

    That guy can say whatever he wants and I hope he stays in the race. Of course I think he’s an idiot that will never get elected, but if wants to run, more power to him.

    When I was in China you could very well be rounded up for saying things like that. Running for office? Yeah, they have a very large governing body of representatives there, but they really don’t have a lot of power.

    I’m glad I can say really stupid things here – I’ve been places where you can as well, but you just might never be seen again.

  5. MTNativeEyes

    I’m trying to figure this out. When running for office in the US, maybe it is OK to say stupid, ignorant things. If that gets you elected, it says everything about the electorate. I find those described actions and statements repulsive, thus goes my vote. But maybe it’s not worth it?

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